Blitz Review: Black Diamond First Light Hoody

Submitted by Lauren on 27th February 2019

Back in January, the lovely people at Intrepid Magazine selected me to be one of their gear testers and sent me a Black Diamond First Light Hoody. The idea was that I’d take it with me to Norway and put it through its paces in the airport, the city and the snow. You can read my detailed review in issue 8, but the short version is, I loved it!

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Blitz Review – Western Mountaineering Expedition Down Booties

Submitted by Thorsten on 19th February 2019

The best thing after a long day of skiing is getting out of your skiing boots and into warm and dry wool socks. Unfortunately, throughout the evening and night, you will have to get out of your sleeping bag and back into the snow at times: to go to the loo, to check the tent, to get something from your pulk, or whatever reason. Enter the Expedition Down Booties.

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Gear Highlight #6 – Navigation and Safety Equipment and other Electronics and Gadgets

Submitted by Thorsten on 22nd January 2019

This will be the last gear highlight for our Hardangervidda crossing. Navigating the unknown terrain safely and limiting risks as far as possible is a priority for us. Much like Amundsen, we want to plan the adventure out of our expedition. Here’s what we are bringing for navigation, personal safety, risk mitigation and some other tools and gadgets.

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Gear Highlight #5 – Tent, Sleeping and Cooking Equipment

Submitted by Thorsten on 17th January 2019

Polar exploration isn’t all about skiing for hours on end. We will spend the majority of our time inside or around our tent. Getting our camp routine and equipment right is just as important as being a capable skier. This gear highlight is going to be a big one. We are going to go over the majority of kit we need when we’re not on the move: the tent and tent equipment, sleeping gear, cooking equipment and food and drink.

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Partnership with The Heat Company

Submitted by Thorsten on 15th January 2019

Taking on extreme challenges like Greenland or Antarctica doesn’t only require extensive planning and physical training, it also involves a lot of kit and money. Partnerships with and sponsorships from companies or organisations can go a long way in helping to overcome the logistical challenges and can make the difference between a dream expedition happening or remaining just a dream. We are already peeking past our upcoming Hardangervidda traverse, and are eyeing Greenland for 2020 and Antarctica later. To keep our adventure going, we are looking to build lasting mutually beneficial relationships with organisations sharing our beliefs and values and manufacturers whose products we trust to be the very best for our expeditions. Today, we are excited to announce our partnership with The Heat Company.

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Gear Highlight #4 – Skiing and Pulk Gear

Submitted by Thorsten on 9th January 2019

We’re done with our clothing now, and we are moving on to our primary means of transportation: skiing and man-hauling. It’s much easier to use a sled to carry our gear than putting it in a rucksack, as we’ll likely have around 35kg of equipment. This gear highlight will tell you what skiing and pulk equipment we have.

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Gear Highlight #3 – Outer shells, Down Clothing, Headgear and Gloves

Submitted by Thorsten on 6th January 2019

Following the layer principle, this time we are going to talk about our outer layers. There are two types of layers to add above the mid-layers: windproof shells, and warmth layers. The shells protect us from the elements and help to stop wind and snow, basically like a rain jacket. They are usually lightweight and don’t add any insulation themselves. While we are on the move, we will usually not wear any additional layers, but once we stop, we need to at least add a down jacket to prevent us from cooling down too fast. The head and hands are our body parts requiring the most additional protection from the elements. Our head, because you lose a lot of heat if you don’t cover it, and of course because our eyes, mouth, and nose sit there. And our hands, because they are exposed to the wind and snow a lot and thus freeze most easily.

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Gear Highlight #2 – Mid Layers for skiing and camping

Submitted by Thorsten on 17th November 2018

In this week’s gear highlight, we are going to cover our mid layers used for skiing and camping. Usually, while skiing, we will not wear that many insulated layers, likely only a fleece jacket over our merino base layers. That’s because we want to avoid sweating too much at all costs, since sweating means you have to dry your base layers. After pitching the tent, the mid layers become a different story, though. We are usually throwing on at least a heavy wool jumper and maybe insulated trousers, because we won’t be moving that much, and thus will freeze more easily.

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Gear Highlight #1 – Base Layers and Underwear

Submitted by Thorsten on 8th November 2018

Today we are starting a weekly series to present the kit we are going to use on our Hardangervidda crossing at the end of January. Each week’s post will deal with one (more or less) well-defined category of gear. We will explain why we are bringing it, and why we are choosing that particular brand, if there is a specific reason. This weeks post will deal with base layers and socks.

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Training like the Pros

Submitted by Thorsten on 21st October 2018

Tyre pulling is today firmly established as the way to train all year for polar expeditions where you are pulling a pulk. Three months before our Hardangervidda crossing, I have started training with tyres myself. I may be a bit late, to be honest, but this will still be valuable exercise for me. There are many blog posts out there on the basics of tyre pulling. The best I know is The fine art of pulling rubber tyres by Børge Ousland. You may as well learn the basics from the best instead of from me, so I am going to focus on the things I learned on top of that article.

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