Gear Highlight #4 – Skiing and Pulk Gear

Submitted by Thorsten on 9th January 2019

We’re done with our clothing now, and we are moving on to our primary means of transportation: skiing and man-hauling. It’s much easier to use a sled to carry our gear than putting it in a rucksack, as we’ll likely have around 35kg of equipment. This gear highlight will tell you what skiing and pulk equipment we have.

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Gear Highlight #3 – Outer shells, Down Clothing, Headgear and Gloves

Submitted by Thorsten on 6th January 2019

Following the layer principle, this time we are going to talk about our outer layers. There are two types of layers to add above the mid-layers: windproof shells, and warmth layers. The shells protect us from the elements and help to stop wind and snow, basically like a rain jacket. They are usually lightweight and don’t add any insulation themselves. While we are on the move, we will usually not wear any additional layers, but once we stop, we need to at least add a down jacket to prevent us from cooling down too fast. The head and hands are our body parts requiring the most additional protection from the elements. Our head, because you lose a lot of heat if you don’t cover it, and of course because our eyes, mouth, and nose sit there. And our hands, because they are exposed to the wind and snow a lot and thus freeze most easily.

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2018 Roundup

Submitted by Lauren on 30th December 2018

As we come to the end of our first year as Team Fram, Thorsten and I wanted to reflect on our progress, and how far we’ve come. We’ve had some amazing experiences, met some fantastic people who’ve supported us with advice and encouragement, and grown to feel like part of a community. We feel very lucky to have got as far as we have, and are really excited about the year to come.

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Winter First Aid

Submitted by Thorsten on 29th December 2018

When going on an adventure, we always put ourselves at risk. There are a thousand ways things can go south when you’re outside and you can only do your best to be prepared for them, never completely eliminate all risks. A good preparation also needs to take into account where you are going and what you are doing. There are different challenges for the human body in hot deserts, in high altitudes or in jungles. Of course, for us aspiring Polar explorers, knowing about the challenges of cold weather and snow is most important.

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Breakfast of Champions

Submitted by Lauren on 16th December 2018

One of the things we looked at in some detail early on in our polar training was our food. Making sure that you get enough calories in, and a good selection of fats, carbs and protein to boot, is a major challenge when you’re trying to cut weight down as much as possible. You need to find food that’s hugely calorie dense, as you’re aiming to eat up to 6000 calories every day! Add to that wanting something you can face eating a for weeks at a time, and it becomes pretty tricky.

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Fridtjof Nansen – The first modern Polar explorer

Submitted by Thorsten on 24th November 2018

On this day 131 years ago, November 24th 1887, a newspaper in Kristiania, as Oslo was called back then, publicised a daring plan, proposed by a young scientist, to cross the Island of Greenland from coast to coast the following year. The man’s name was Fridtjof Nansen and he would go on to become arguably the most influential figure in the history of Polar explorationn

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Gear Highlight #2 – Mid Layers for skiing and camping

Submitted by Thorsten on 17th November 2018

In this week’s gear highlight, we are going to cover our mid layers used for skiing and camping. Usually, while skiing, we will not wear that many insulated layers, likely only a fleece jacket over our merino base layers. That’s because we want to avoid sweating too much at all costs, since sweating means you have to dry your base layers. After pitching the tent, the mid layers become a different story, though. We are usually throwing on at least a heavy wool jumper and maybe insulated trousers, because we won’t be moving that much, and thus will freeze more easily.

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A List of Antarctic firsts

Submitted by Thorsten on 11th November 2018

The polar exploration community is currently buzzing with news about Colin O’Brady and Loius Rudd. Both are taking on a challenge nobody has successfully completed, yet: a solo traverse of Antarctica via the South Pole, unsupported, and using only human power. You can follow Lou Rudd’s journey on his sponsor’s website, and Colin O’Brady on his Instagram or his own website. These expeditions stand out because they are one of the last supposed firsts out there to achieve for polar explorers. Since the first humans set foot on the Antarctic continent explorers have always found ways to add more challenges to their journey or make it unique in some way or another to qualify for that precious “first” label. Let’s take a look at some notable firsts in Antarctic history.

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Gear Highlight #1 – Base Layers and Underwear

Submitted by Thorsten on 8th November 2018

Today we are starting a weekly series to present the kit we are going to use on our Hardangervidda crossing at the end of January. Each week’s post will deal with one (more or less) well-defined category of gear. We will explain why we are bringing it, and why we are choosing that particular brand, if there is a specific reason. This weeks post will deal with base layers and socks.

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My Great Escape

Submitted by Lauren on 1st November 2018

For the last year, I’ve been working with a fantastic new organisation, MY Great Escape. We support women who’ve survived abusive relationships to have adventures, with the aim of offering them a physical challenge and space in the outdoors to heal and build their confidence and self esteem.

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